Justin C. Duft, JD, CFP, MSFS, CLU, ChFC, CLTC

Justin C. Duft, JD, CFP®, MSFS®, CLU®, ChFC®, CLTC, is manager, advanced planning, at Commonwealth Financial Network®, member FINRA/SIPC, an independent broker/dealer–RIA. With the firm since 2007, Justin acts as a resource for advisors on issues involving executive benefits, business, tax, estate, and charitable planning, and his strong background in insurance adds a unique perspective to the planning process. Justin has a JD from New England Law│Boston, an MS in financial services from The American College of Financial Services, and a BS in business administration from Northeastern University. He also holds FINRA Series 6, 7, 24, and 63 securities registrations.

Information about securities-registered professionals may be found at FINRA BROKERCHECK.

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Recent Posts

Pensions and Social Security: The Impact of the WEP and GPO

6 Retirement Questions Financial Advisors Should Prepare For (And Every Client Should Ask)

Protecting Senior Clients from Elder Financial Abuse

When to Claim Social Security: Changing the Conversation

Changing Your Client's Irrevocable Trust: What Are the Options?

Pensions and Social Security: The Impact of the WEP and GPO

Posted by Justin C. Duft, JD, CFP, MSFS, CLU, ChFC, CLTC

January 25, 2017 at 1:30 PM

When it comes to planning for retirement income for those clients who have a history of working in both the public and private sectors, things can get tricky. Specifically, there are two legislative provisions—the windfall elimination provision (WEP) and the government pension offset (GPO)—designed to prevent these individuals from receiving their full pensions and social security benefits, which can drastically affect how much retirement income they receive.

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Topics: Retirement Income Planning

6 Retirement Questions Financial Advisors Should Prepare For (And Every Client Should Ask)

Posted by Justin C. Duft, JD, CFP, MSFS, CLU, ChFC, CLTC

January 24, 2017 at 10:00 AM

When it comes to planning for the future, clients will have many questions for you, their trusted advisor. By responding carefully—and with relevant, detailed information—you'll help your clients make well-informed decisions and reach their retirement goals.

But what will your clients want to know? Here are six critical retirement questions financial advisors should prepare for (and every client should ask).

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Topics: Retirement Income Planning

Protecting Senior Clients from Elder Financial Abuse

Posted by Justin C. Duft, JD, CFP, MSFS, CLU, ChFC, CLTC

August 10, 2016 at 1:30 PM

Working with elderly clients can present a unique set of challenges. For one, seniors are a major target for elder financial abuse and fraudulent schemes. For another, they have a different mind-set than that of younger generations. They are more fearful of risk, but also tend to be more trusting and, therefore, more susceptible to abuse.

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Topics: Estate Planning

When to Claim Social Security: Changing the Conversation

Posted by Justin C. Duft, JD, CFP, MSFS, CLU, ChFC, CLTC

August 3, 2016 at 1:30 PM

When the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2015 was first signed into law, you might remember a mad scramble to determine how the legislation would affect the guidance you provided to your clients. To make it worse, the rule changes affected individuals differently, depending on how old they were at certain points in time. But now that some of those rules have been eliminated by since-passed deadlines, do you have a clear picture of the best way to advise clients? Have the new rules changed the recommendations you make about when to claim social security?

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Topics: Retirement Income Planning

Changing Your Client's Irrevocable Trust: What Are the Options?

Posted by Justin C. Duft, JD, CFP, MSFS, CLU, ChFC, CLTC

April 13, 2016 at 1:30 PM

Irrevocable trusts have a variety of uses and benefits—to help avoid estate taxes, create a legacy for future generations, or provide financial support for a disabled family. Whatever the purpose, grantors enjoy tremendous flexibility when designing an irrevocable trust. But once that trust is in place, the ability to adjust its direction is often limited by rigid rules. As a result, over time, a trust’s initial purpose may no longer align with the intentions of the grantor and/or the interests of the beneficiaries.

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Topics: Estate Planning

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